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InnoSetup

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John Bentley
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InnoSetup

I would like InnoSetup to be portable. It is open source so it might be possible.

John T. Haller
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Sorta Open

It's actually only sorta open. It doesn't use an OSI-approved license, so we couldn't make a portable version and host it on SourceForge, for instance.

Sometimes, the impossible can become possible, if you're awesome!

Bruce Pascoe
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Inno Setup
Inno Setup License
==================

Except where otherwise noted, all of the documentation and software included
in the Inno Setup package is copyrighted by Jordan Russell.

Copyright (C) 1997-2005 Jordan Russell. All rights reserved.

This software is provided "as-is," without any express or implied warranty.
In no event shall the author be held liable for any damages arising from the
use of this software.

Permission is granted to anyone to use this software for any purpose,
including commercial applications, and to alter and redistribute it,
provided that the following conditions are met:

1. All redistributions of source code files must retain all copyright
   notices that are currently in place, and this list of conditions without
   modification.

2. All redistributions in binary form must retain all occurrences of the
   above copyright notice and web site addresses that are currently in
   place (for example, in the About boxes).

3. The origin of this software must not be misrepresented; you must not
   claim that you wrote the original software. If you use this software to
   distribute a product, an acknowledgment in the product documentation
   would be appreciated but is not required.

4. Modified versions in source or binary form must be plainly marked as
   such, and must not be misrepresented as being the original software.


Jordan Russell
jr-2005 AT jrsoftware.org
http://www.jrsoftware.org/

This resembles a BSD-style license. What exactly in that license is stopping you from making a portable version and hosting it somewhere?

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John T. Haller
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Differences, Mainly Clause 2

It differs a bit from any of the OSI-approved licenses. In addition to requiring a copyright notice within the documentation (which is used in other licenses including new-BSD), it also requires that "redistributions in binary form must retain all occurrences of the above copyright notice and web site addresses that are currently in place (for example, in the About boxes)". So, if you were to use only a piece of this code in another program, how would you reconcile that? If OpenOffice were to add in a few routines from this, would they have to modify their About box to include links to the InnoSetup site? If multiple projects with similar licenses were used as source code bits for another project, would you need links to all of them in their about box and anywhere else that the source projects had URLs and about credits? Would the splash screen count? How many projects could you fit on the splash screen or in the about box? It seems like a similar issue to the advertising clause in the old-style BSD license (which is not GPL compatible and is not OSI approved). Albeit, this is in-program as opposed to in-advertising. I'd wager this license would be rejected if submitted for OSI certification.

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Bruce Pascoe
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...

I don't want to start an argument here (I'm no lawyer), but I believe the second clause is referring to redistributions of the original binary. It just doesn't make much sense to me that any open-source license--OSI-approved or otherwise--would have a clause so obnoxious that you have to link to the original program's webpage in your own About box just because you used their code.

Edit: Though you make a good point about that horrible, horrible advertising clause in the original BSD license, so who knows? *throws arms up in the air in surrender*

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fatcerberus@yahoo.com  [aim: fatcerberus]
I have no witty remarks or quotes to share at the moment.

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