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IObitUnlocker Portable v1.1.2 - IObitUnlocker.sys File Not Digitally Signed

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Abraxian
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IObitUnlocker Portable v1.1.2 - IObitUnlocker.sys File Not Digitally Signed

Just downloaded and 'installed' IObitUnlocker Portable. On launch, after a few seconds, I get the following Windows Error/Warning message:

[Window Title] Program Compatibility Assistant
[Main Instruction] Windows requires a digitally signed driver

A recently installed program tried to install an unsigned driver. This version of Windows requires all drivers to have a valid digital signature. The driver is unavailable and the program that uses this driver might not work correctly.
Uninstall the program or device that uses this driver and check the publisher's support website to get a digitally signed driver.
Driver: IObitUnlocker Driver
Service: IObitUnlocker
Publisher: IObit
Location: E:\Portables\DIS...\IObitUnlocker.sys

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I'm on Windows 7 Pro. x64. How to solve this? Maybe someone needs to check this IObitUnlocker package.

John T. Haller
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New Version

A new version is being published shortly, so I'd suggest trying that one first.

Sometimes, the impossible can become possible, if you're awesome!

Abraxian
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Seems Okay Now

Kind of maybe and ops! moment. I just did a reboot and then tried launching again and the problem didn't turn up again. Don't know what's happening but (for now?) it seems to have fixed itself.

I'll surely try the new version once PortableApps releases it.

Many thanks.

Use Portable Apps on both Flash Drive and HDD/SSD.

Abraxian
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I Found Out What was Going Wrong

Hi John,

I found out what was going wrong. Long story but as briefly as I can. Today I tried to install Sandboxie to my system. Result was I got the same error/warning message for that as I reported above for trying to run PortableApps ioBit Unlocker. I thought that really strange so went to Sandboxie forums and after a search found what the problem was there.

The following is the case with respect to people running Windows 7 x86/x64 SP1 systems that they don't update:

(1) Win7 SP1 systems can't deal with SHA-256 digital signatures. (To get that facility the user needs to update their system.)
(2) Software developers are now increasing signing drivers and so on with SHA-256.
(3) When 1 + 2 happen then Win7 SP1 users that don't update the system run into the problem I reported.

The Sandboxie forum recommended that Win7 SP1 users that don't update their systems (I'm one of them) need to install a Microsoft update that allows the system to manage SHA-256 signatures. The necessary update is Microsoft KB3033929. So I went off and researched that a little. Result of my research was that is better to install another update as well (linked somewhat to KB3033929). That is Microsoft KB3035131. However, they must be installed in this order: First, install KB3035131 then after doing that install KB3033929.

Installing those two updates cured my problems with both programs. Wasn't the drivers not being signed, just that the Win7 SP1 system was incapable of reading the signatures.

I thought I should post the information in here at PortableApps as it might be something you'll want keep under your hat for the future.

To verify what I've said above, and to actually download the updates for Win7 SP1 systems, the following links are useful:

Read the two posts by "Barb" (one right after the other -- the first one to "Hello guy213," the second one to "All,") on this webpage: https://forums.sandboxie.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=134219#p134219

To get the manual installer for Microsoft KB3033929 Update (and to see the advisory saying to also install KB3035131): https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/security-updates/SecurityAdvisories/201...

To get the manual installer for Microsoft KB3035131 update: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/security-updates/SecurityBulletins/2015...

Hope this helps.

P.S. I read the whole Sandboxie thread pointed to above and it seems that there are lot of people using Win7 SP1 that don't, and won't unless utterly essential, update their install. I also know from other forums that this is a common attitude reported in those forums too.

P.P.S. After I installed the Microsoft updates I found out that you had newly posted up the ioBit Unlocker update at PortableApps. So downloaded, 'installed', and running with no issues.

Use Portable Apps on both Flash Drive and HDD/SSD.

John T. Haller
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Why Run Insecure?

Out of curiosity, why are you running an insecure and outdated Windows 7 install? That would explain things though.

Worth noting that we dual sign our releases with SHA1 and SHA2 to ensure they work on older OSes. No idea if the signatures show up correctly on an outdated Win7, though.

Also worth noting that none of our stuff is supported on an out of date copy of Windows, regardless of version, due to the many problems and inconsistencies that will arise vs a proper stable copy.

Sometimes, the impossible can become possible, if you're awesome!

Abraxian
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(Initially) Avoid 'Upgrade' to Windows 10 and Microsoft Spyware

Initially I, and lot of other users, stopped updating Win7 when Microsoft started auto-updating folks to get Win10. When MS were in the game of the Win10 update they also started including lots of so-called 'telemetry' stuff in their updates. Of course, 'telemetry' is just another (supposed to be innocuous) term for 'spyware'. Microsoft's attitude was when all this kicked off, and still is, your data is our data. Sod that for a laugh. They are literally installing a spyware-suite onto users systems and claiming it's an operating system.

While all this messing around from Microsoft's end was going on a fair number of the more knowledgeable computer users started trying to vet what updates would get installed to their systems (to avoid Win10 and to avoid the spyware). They were doing things like 'hiding' update 'x' (actually multiples of them, 'a', 'b', 'c' . . . and so on) on the Microsoft update site to avoid downloading and installing it. Result of that was that Microsoft started, of their own account, unhiding some of the updates the users had hidden (in the hope that users wouldn't notice) and download and install. Other trick they got up to was to start re-labelling update 'x' to something else -- another attempt at trying to subvert users avoiding the so-called 'telemetry' stuff. Another trick they got up to was amalgamating update 'x' (which users didn't want) into update 'y' -- again trying to push their spy-ware onto users -- the magical 'cumulative' update with added spyware shoved in for free. They were also marking updates that self-evidently weren't 'critical' (though I believe they've change that category label now) into that category and tried punting their spyware that way. They were also backporting spyware intended for Win10 to be used on Win7 systems -- get the picture. This sort of behaviour on the part of Microsoft is well documented in forums.

Once I cottoned on to the sheer extent and sinisterness of all this that was it for me. Clean install of Win7 SP1 and no updates unless truly, utterly, essential -- I sure ain't the only one that did that. System is rock-solid no problems, this SHA signing issue is the only thing so far that has forced me to do an update.

Lastly, when you say 'outdated' system that is a pretty loaded term. What is 'outdated' about a system that works just fine? Also when you say why run 'insecure' you're using a loaded term and failing to see part of what and who the enemy is that you want to protect yourself from. See, 'insecure' would nowadays have to include am I secured against Microsoft. If you do automatic updates then the answer to that is a definite, No! If you are doing automatic updates then you are quite literally loading your system into a state of insecurity. I'm not kidding. The only possible way out of this would be to manually vet every update Microsoft offer, and let's face it the information that Microsoft supplies to users on what exactly update 'x', 'y' and 'z' are is very often opaque to say the least. Knowledgeable people on forums are attempting this and, to my way of thinking, tying themselves in knots in doing so. For me, I don't want to have spend hours of my life vetting Microsoft updates, the easy way out is base install and only update if totally essential. There are a lot of people out here that nowadays think exactly the same way. Microsoft stopped playing by the rules quite some time ago -- to avoid noticing that is true folly. They want your data, and they are getting it, by hook or by crook. 'Telemetry' -- really!

Use Portable Apps on both Flash Drive and HDD/SSD.

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